Epilepsy + Original Articles

10 Home Safety Tips for People With Epilepsy

From installing carpets to ensuring doors open outward, learn how to reduce the risk of injury. Basic home safety is important for everyone, but especially for people with epilepsy. The unpredictable nature of the disease means that seizures may occur at any time, putting epileptics at high risk of injury from falls or loss of balance. Here are 10 simple tips to keep yourself and your loved ones safe at home: 1.

The Newest Treatments for Epilepsy

What are the cutting-edge options for treating this neurological disorder? If you're living with epilepsy, you probably take antiepileptic medications regularly to control your symptoms. But for about a third of epileptics, even the best medical treatments won't be effective. New Treatment Options There's hope on the horizon for people with uncontrolled epilepsy, according to Christopher DeGiorgio, MD, a Professor of Neurology at UCLA, and Vice President of Neurology at NeuroSigma, a Los Angeles medical device company.

4 Common Treatment Options for Epilepsy

Anti-epileptic drugs are usually the first course of treatment for people with epilepsy, but surgery, dietary changes, and other approaches may prove useful. Just as there isn't one single type of epilepsy, there isn't one single treatment that will work for the three million Americans who suffer from this neurological disorder. Here's a rundown of the most common therapies relied upon by people with epilepsy: Drugs Fortunately, most people with epilepsy can completely eliminate their seizures by taking one anti-seizure medication, and a significant portion of the rest can reduce the severity and frequency of their seizures.

Health by the Numbers: Epilepsy

With the right treatment, most individuals with epilepsy can live normal, happy lives. Here's a look at the disease by the numbers. Epilepsy, a chronic neurological disorder, produces seizures that can last from a few seconds to a few minutes. Individuals with this medical condition can experience symptoms that range from convulsions to blank staring to jerking movements in the arms and legs.

What Can Reiki Do for You?

While acupuncture, massage, and chiropractic garner most of the attention, Reiki quietly benefits patients in its own gentle way. Complementary and alternative healing practices are becoming mainstream as people search for ways to support health naturally. While acupuncture, massage, and chiropractic garner most of the attention, Reiki quietly benefits patients in its own gentle way.

Could Neurofeedback Retrain Your Brain?

Although the procedure may sound complex, the intended results are not. NFT seeks to teach a brain with a particular abnormality how to behave normally. Picture the scene from TV. A patient suffering from some mental malady is holed up in a windowless office, electrodes placed strategically about her head, while a screen records responses to various stimuli. It's fiction, but the premise is anchored in scientific accuracy.

Could Magnet Treatment Cure Depression?

There's a potential new treatment for depression that is showing promising results in studies and clinical trials, especially for patients who don't respond to traditional therapy. There's a potential new treatment for depression that is showing promising results in studies and clinical trials, especially for patients who don't respond to traditional therapy. Transcranial Magnet Stimulation (TMS) uses magnetic fields to stimulate nerve cells in the brain involved in mood control and depression.

Understanding Epileptic Seizures

There is currently no cure for epilepsy, but with the right treatment, most people with the condition can lead normal, fulfilling lives. More than 2 million people in the United States have been diagnosed with epilepsy, according to the National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke (NINDS). But as common as epilepsy is, stigmas about the condition have only recently begun to be dispelled.

Dispelling the Top 5 Epilepsy Myths

Although much is still unknown about epilepsy, experts agree that these common myths are not true. Epilepsy--the mere word often conjures images that are either terribly frightening or simply inaccurate. And despite being first documented by Hippocrates in 400 B.C., the cause of this brain disorder, which is primarily characterized by recurrent seizures, is still largely a mystery.
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