Asthma + Original Articles

Working Out Can Improve Asthma Symptoms

Breathe hard to breathe easier! Are you worried that exercise could trigger an asthma attack? It's a not uncommon fear, and in the past, "There was a belief that people with asthma shouldn't do physical activity as it might trigger an asthma attack," says Simon L. Bacon, PhD, professor of exercise science at Concordia University in Montreal.

6 Ways to Help Your Child Cope With Asthma

Asthma is the most common chronic illness in children, resulting in 10.5 million missed school days annually. About 6.3 million children under the age of 18 have asthma, according to the American College of Allergy, Asthma and Immunology. Asthma is the most common chronic illness in children, resulting in 10.5 million missed school days annually. Even more alarming, "Allergy and asthma rates are increasing and we still don’t know why," says Janna Tuck MD, an allergist in Cape Girardeau, Missouri and spokesperson for the American College of Allergy, Asthma and Immunology.

10 Questions to Ask Your Doctor about Asthma

Become a more informed (and empowered!) patient by asking these questions during your next appointment! We spoke to Janna Tuck, MD, an allergist in Cape Girardeau, Missouri and spokesperson for the American College of Allergy, Asthma and Immunology (ACAAI), about what to ask your physician about asthma. Become a more informed (and empowered!) patient by asking these questions during your next appointment! 1.

Does Your Office Suffer From Sick-Building Syndrome?

Could work literally be making you sick? You may joke that you're allergic to work, and you could be right! If you regularly experience fatigue, or cold or asthma-like symptoms while at the office, your building could actually be making you sick. So-called sick buildings have indoor air that is compromised in some way.

Dealing With Asthma During the Summer

4 asthma triggers—and how to avoid them. The season of sunshine, warmth, and long days outdoors can put a real damper on the fun for some asthma patients. While other people with asthma may have difficulty with the bracing cold of winter, your enemies include wilting humidity and hazy, particulate-filled air.

Why Asthma Patients Are More Likely To Develop Osteoporosis

Osteoporosis affects roughly 10 million people over 50 in the U.S. What is the connection with asthma? Are you one of the approximately 25 million people in the U.S. with asthma? If you are, you should know that in addition to having to deal with the symptoms associated with this chronic disease, you may also be at higher risk of osteoporosis, or thinning bones.

8 Ways to Clean Up Your Mold-Related Asthma

Be wary of energy efficiency treatments, and follow these steps. Do you or a family member have asthma? If so, you should know that staying safe from triggers starts inside the home: Dampness and mold growth inside the home can make your asthma flare. And now, researchers have discovered that treatments to improve energy efficiency in the home are a culprit, according to a recent article in the Journal of Allergy and Clinical Immunology.

Don t Let Allergies Come Between You and Your Pet: 7 Helpful Hints to Reduce Symptoms

Suffering from allergies triggered by your pet? Don t give away Mittens or Fido just yet. Read on for ways to minimize your symptoms. As many people who have dogs or cats know, pets are beloved members of the family. So it can come as a nasty surprise when handling or just being around Fido or Mittens starts to cause sneezing, sniffling, and itchy eyes. Allergies can strike at any time—even if you never had them when you were a child.

Anatomy of an Asthma Attack

What happens during an asthma attack? Here s what you need to know to treat attacks quickly and prevent future ones. If you’ve ever watched someone have an asthma attack, or had one yourself, you may have wondered how the attack started and what produces such uncomfortable (and scary) symptoms. Here’s how an asthma attack happens: The Asthma Trigger: First, an asthma sufferer encounters something that acts as a trigger—such as a viral infection, an allergy to a particular substance, air pollution, cold air, exercise, or even stress and emotional upset.

Do You Have an Asthma Action Plan?

Do you have a written treatment plan for your asthma? If you don t, you should! Here s why. Asthma is an unpredictable condition, but there are certain things that can be done to prevent triggers and deal with an attack. A written asthma treatment plan—a course of action for patients—will help you (and those around you) to avoid asthma triggers, treat flare-ups, and determine when and if medical intervention is necessary.
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