Lactose Intolerance + Original Articles

Diagnosed With Lactose Intolerance? Tips to Cope

Just because you can't tolerate dairy products doesn't mean you can't find delicious substitutes. Here are five tips for dealing with the digestive woe. If you've discovered you're lactose intolerant, you may be wondering how you'll survive without milk, cheese and perhaps most importantly, ice cream. Fear not. We've got five tips for how to deal with lactose intolerance that will even let you enjoy the occasional slice of pizza or a sundae—with all the toppings! What Is Lactose Intolerance? Lactose intolerance means you have trouble digesting the milk sugar found in dairy products like milk, cheese, and ice cream.

Milk Allergy or Intolerance: What's the Difference?

Symptoms of lactose intolerance and an allergic reaction to milk are different. Here's how to tell them apart and what it means for you if you have to forgo dairy products for either reason. Not milk? If you regularly develop digestive symptoms, such as abdominal cramps, bloating, gas, diarrhea, or nausea shortly after drinking milk or consuming food with dairy, you're not alone. But is it an allergy or an intolerance? Here's the difference.

8 Digestive Health Myths

We separate fact from fiction for these common digestive misconceptions. 1. Spicy foods cause ulcers. Ulcers—open sores located in the stomach (gastric ulcers) or small intestine (duodenal ulcers)—are not caused by certain foods, according to the experts at the American College of Gastroenterology. Though certain foods can irritate an ulcer that is already there, they don't cause the sore.

Food Allergy or Food Intolerance? How to Tell the Difference

After finishing a delicious meal, you suddenly feel itchy and your stomach hurts. Could the problem be caused by a food allergy or a food intolerance? It can be difficult to tell at first, but there are signs that can help you get to the root of the problem. After finishing a delicious meal, you suddenly feel itchy and your stomach hurts. Could the problem be caused by a food allergy or a food intolerance? It can be difficult to tell at first, but there are signs that can help you get to the root of the problem.

Can You Outgrow Lactose Intolerance?

Being lactose intolerant means that you cannot digest the milk sugar (lactose) in dairy products. While the condition isn't serious, the symptoms can be quite uncomfortable. So, is it possible to outgrow it? Being lactose intolerant means that you cannot digest the milk sugar (lactose) in dairy products and while the problem is not serious, the symptoms can be uncomfortable. Lactose intolerance is caused by a deficiency of lactase-an enzyme produced by the cells lining your small intestine, which breaks down the lactase molecules in the foods you eat into two sugars, glucose and galactose.

Lactose Intolerance 101

Millions of people have difficulty digesting milk and other dairy products. Find out how to identify and diagnose lactose intolerance. If you've ever eaten too much cheese or polished off a pint of ice cream in one sitting, you probably felt sick to your stomach. Most likely, the cramping, bloating, and abdominal pain you felt were caused by your body's inability to break down lactose, which is found in most dairy products.

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